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New Book On Balochi And Balochistan

We are happy to announce that the book “The Baloch and Others” has been published

Dear friends,

We are happy to announce that the book “The Baloch and Others.
Linguistic, Historical and Socio-Political Perspectives on Pluralism in Balochistan” has been published.
The book contains revised versions of papers on political, sociological,
historical and linguistic topics presented at the Third international
conference on Balochistan studies, at Uppsala University in August 2005
http://www.lingfil. uu.se/info/ bal.html

You can find the table of contents and ordering details at
http://titus. uni-frankfurt. de/personal/ agnes/uppsala2. htm

For those who do not yet have the previous volume,
“The Baloch and Their Neighbours:
Ethnic and Linguistic Contact in Balochistan in Historical and Modern
Times”, both books are available together at a special package price.

Just mail the publishing house
info@reichert- verlag.de
or use the order form at
http://titus. uni-frankfurt. de/personal/ agnes/uppsala050 0.pdf

With best wishes,
Agnes Korn


Dr. Agnes Korn
Vergleichende Sprachwissenschaft
Universitaet Frankfurt a.M.
PF 11 19 32, Fach 171
D – 60054 Frankfurt
http://titus. uni-frankfurt.de

National Fabric, Iran’s Etnic Minorities

Putting aside the issue of marginalisation, poverty, and systematic discrimination, the Baloch face immense challenges in holding onto their unique cultural identity in the face of the dominance of Persian culture.

Baloch
Balochistan sits in Iran’s far southeast-a hot, dry, windblasted region stretching out alongside the Indian Ocean and into Pakistan. Sparsely populated, and subject to decades of underinvestment and neglect by the central government, Iranian Balochistan is one of the most
deprived and underdeveloped regions of Iran. With a population standing at around 1.5 to 2 million, the Baloch constitute one of the smaller minority communities in Iran. Putting aside the issue of marginalisation, poverty, and systematic discrimination, the Baloch face immense challenges in holding onto their unique cultural identity in the face of the dominance of Persian culture.
The Baloch language is still largely an oral one, and as a result the publication of Balochi literature remains very limited, with the problem exacerbated by pervasive state suppression and an under-equipped and underfunded education system. Porous land borders with Pakistan and Afghanistan have also allowed for the flourishing of the drugs trade, and the free flow of militants into the region-crises which have been met by an intense militarisation from Tehran, and the deployment of thousands of Iranian soldiers. In the following chapter we’ll provide a short history of this fiercely independent region of Iran, explore the extent of its neglect and abuse by the central government, and look at some of the ways that the Baloch have been making use of modern technology to defend their unique linguistic and cultural identity.
To read complet report visit the link:
http://smallmedia.org.uk/nationalfabric/Nationalfabric.pdf

Iran’s Stand Off With The United Nations

The best way to hinder Iran’s extremist government from achieving its nuclear goals is to support and cooperate with the democratic forces that are struggling for people’s sovereignty and for a secular, democratic, and federal structure in Iran

Announcement

03-03-2006

The resumption of uranium enrichment by the Iranian government with the objective of achieving the full scientific nuclear capability was in direct defiance of the international community’s efforts to reach a resolution through negotiations. The Iranian leadership wants to keep the focus exclusively on nuclear issues to keep the limelight off potentially more explosive issues such as economic and social problems, violations of human rights, tyranny against oppressed nations, and discrimination against women.

The international community in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) showed a united front in its decision to report Iran to the UN Security council on the 6th of March if Iran refuses to cooperate fully and will not halt all nuclear research.

A lack of cooperation by Iran could lead to economical sanctions, or at worst, to a military confrontation between Iran and the international community.

The Iranian government’s policies and its confrontational approach to international issues, especially its lack of cooperation with IAEA, makes it the sole party responsible for any definitive outcome.

Punishing the Iranian government will hurt the Iranian peoples (especially oppressed nationalities within Iran) whom are already discriminated against in all spheres of life. This makes it urgent for all democratic forces in Iran to unite in the struggle to change the regime so as to avoid more difficulties for the people of Iran.

In the other hand, the international community’s focus on the nuclear issue and its lack of emphasis on gross human right violations and suppression against oppressed nationalities has not been useful in rounding up the support of the Iranian people.

The best way to hinder Iran’s extremist government from achieving its nuclear goals is to support and cooperate with the democratic forces that are struggling for people’s sovereignty and for a secular, democratic, and federal structure in Iran.

Unlike in previous years, there is now a united opposition against the Iranian government. The Congress of Nationalities for a Federal Iran, consisting of eight political parties and organizations that are struggling to establish a federal and democratic government, can serve as a catalyst and organizer for united opposition to overthrow the government, which supports terrorism and extremism.

The Congress of Nationalities for a Federal Iran

1- Azerbaijan Cultural Society
2- Balochistan National Movement – Iran
3- Balochistan People’s Party
4- Balochistan United Front of Iran
5- Democratic Party of Kurdistan – Iran
6- Democratic Solidarity Party of Ahwaz
7- Komela Party – Iran
8- Organization for Defence of the Rights of the Turkmen People

Another World Is Possible

I come from the land of the Baloch people, Balochistan. To understand the Baloch women I have to give you a brief introduction of her motherland. Monireh Sulemani.

I come from the land of the Baloch people, Balochistan. To understand the Baloch women I have to give you a brief introduction of her motherland.

Balochistan is presently form part of three territorial states of Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan. The country is strategically situated at the eastern flank of the Middle East, linking Central Asian states with the Indian subcontinent and the Indian Ocean. The Baloch land in all practical and strategic purpose has served as a buffer zone between ancient empires and during last few centuries between the Russian possession in central Asia and British India. The country has been a trade route for ancient peoples of central Asia and India and the Middle East.
Some estimates put the Baloch population about 20 million, over four million living in Iran[1], about two million in Afghanistan and 14 million in Pakistan.

The present day Balochistan is being deprived of basic socio-cultural and political rights of its people by Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan These states are basically being governed not by civilized rule of political and cultural behavior but mostly in the name of religion distorting facts of history and denying the national minorities their minimum political and cultural rights allowed by the various conventions of United Nations.

Our topic is female emancipation, how can the Baloch women find a better future for herself. She is by international law, article 18 of the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights given the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion.

The Declaration on the rights of Indigenous peoples gives her the right to unrestricted self-determination, an inalienable collective right to the ownership, use and control of lands, territories and other natural resources.

But in reality she lives in the most undeveloped region where illiteracy is high and access to clean water a is privilege.
The Iranian government have forbidden the Balochi language in public and formal places. Baloch children are deprived of using their mother tongue as the medium of instruction at schools. This create alienated feeling with young Baloch people who do not feel represented in the society they live in

By the time Balochistan was annexed to Iran, the British had long since introduced opium to the Balochistan region. However, compared to other areas of Iran, its use was limited to a handful of tribal leaders, mostly in the Sistan area of Balochistan.
When the Pahlavi regime was forced out of power by the Islamic Revolution, drugs were a growing problem in Balochistan and heroin had already been introduced to the society.
The Islamic Revolution and the new rulers, many of whom were newcomers to power and set out to become rich quickly, saw drug trafficking in Balochistan as a fast and easy way to make a fortune. Balochistan’s geographic location next to Afghanistan, where opium was grown, and Pakistan, where heroin was produced, made it ideal for these new officials, none of whom were local or Baloch.
The new rulers in Tehran turned a blind eye to these drug lords, who were government officials or their close associates, and concentrated their fight on petty drug dealers. They deliberately mixed the fight against drugs with the suppression of the Baloch national movement.
These obstacles are killing the spirit of the Baloch woman.
The governments of Iran and Pakistan are now targeting the Baloch woman as a way to kill the Baloch nationalism.
Ms. Zarina Marri, a 23-year-old schoolteacher from Balochistan province, was arrested in late 2005, she has been held incommunicado in an army torture cell at Karachi, the capital of Sindh province. She has been repeatedly raped by the military officers and is being used as a sex slave, to induce arrested nationalist activists to sign state-concocted confessions. One man, who was arrested by a state agency and kept in military torture cell almost for nine months, narrated the story of this young woman to Reporters Without Borders, the International Red Cross; and at Woolwich Court in London. The current whereabouts of the young woman are not known. It has been asserted that women who are fighting for the greater autonomy of Balochistan are being arrested by the state agencies and being forced into sex slavery in their custody.

She needs access to education because the Baloch woman is the future of Balochistan as it is she who passes on the linguistic education to the new generation and she is the heart of the culture.
She needs to be in control of the natural resources of her land so that the Baloch society can bloom in prosperity.
She has to be incorporated in the constitution of her country as a First class citizen.
In another world Baloch woman is protected by the United Nations declaration of Human rights.
In another world the Baloch woman is enjoying the right to communication in her own mother tongue.
In another world the Baloch woman would freely benefit from her Ethnical belonging.

This paper was presented By Munireh Sulemani At Social Forum in Brazilian 30 January 2009

Iran’s Burnt City Yields Ancient Graves

A brick-walled quadrangular grave was found at the site, which is believed by archeologists to be unique among the discoveries of the past 30 years.

The skeletons have been eroded and no artifacts have been found inside the graves.

“Up to now ten different types of burials have been found in Burnt City, seven of which are extremely rare with only three or four examples of them in the area,” said head of the archeology team, Seyyed Mansour Seyyed Sajjadi.

“These rare burials may have belonged to emigrants, who were buried according to their own rituals,” he added.

Over 400 prehistoric sites have been excavated in Burnt City and archeologists expect the number to reach 1000.

The 5000-year-old Burnt City is located near the city of Zabol and spans an area of over 300,000 hectares.

Four civilizations have lived in the city which was burnt down three times and not rebuilt after the last fire.

The world’s oldest animated picture, dice and backgammon set, the earliest known caraway seed and artificial eyeball have been found in Burnt City.

Iran Publishes Burnt City Eye Bulletin

Iran’s Sistan-Baluchestan Province has published a bulletin about the artificial eye, unearthed in the historical Burnt City site.

The Persian-English bulletin was published at the start of the 12th phase of Burnt City archeological excavations.

The 5,000 year-old eye was unearthed two years ago and is believed to be the olebrahimpour_zabol_2009_large.jpgdest prosthetic in the world.

Made of natural tar and animal fat, the eye was placed inside the left eye socket of a 28- to 32-year-old woman.

A leather pouch was also found beside the female skeleton appears to have been used to keep the eye when it was removed.

The 5000-year-old Burnt City is located near the northeastern city of Zabol and spans an area of over 300,000 hectares.

Four civilizations have lived in the city which was burnt down three times and not rebuilt after the last fire.

The world’s oldest animated picture, dice and backgammon set, and caraway seed has been found in Burnt City.

TE/HGH

Source: http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=80238&sectionid=351020105

A Discussion On The Use Of Baloch And Balochi

Baloch: Baloch is generally known as a noun. The native people who live in Balochistan are called Baloch. Generally Baloch people speak Balochi, but even if native people can’t speak Balochi, they are still called Baloch. They can migrate and live in other parts of the world. They can still refer to themselves as Baloch. So, I believe that it is now accepted that “Baloch” is noun in this context.
What is the adjective of “Baloch” in English? Our land is called Balochistan, that point is clear. We live in Balochistan. We speak Balochi, we have several Balochi dialects, we weave Balochi carpets, we ride Balochi camels, we give Balochi names to our children. We read Balochi poetry which is published, say, by the Balochi Academy.
However, I have also noticed that often “Baloch” is used as the adjective:

Baloch cultural tradition
Baloch Students’ Organisation
Baloch authors
Baloch ethnicity
Baloch nationalism
Baloch National Movement
Baloch men
Baloch ethnic group
Baloch people

And what about the noun? Am I a Baloch or Balochi? Are my parents Baloch, Balochs, Balochis or Baloches?

Baloch: Baloch is generally known as a noun. The native people who live in Balochistan are called Baloch. Generally Baloch people speak Balochi, but even if native people can’t speak Balochi, they are still called Baloch. They can migrate and live in other parts of the world. They can still refer to themselves as Baloch. So, I believe that it is now accepted that “Baloch” is noun in this context.
Mistakenly, some non-Baloch scholars use the word “Balochi”, instead of “Baloch” when referring to people of Balochistan. For instance, they may say: “Baaraan is Balochi”. It is wrong. “Baaraan is a Baloch” is the right expression. One may say that “Baaraan is a Balochi name”, which is a correct phrase to say.

So, I am a Baloch, not Balochi (likewise, Hazhaar is a Kurd. Hazhaar is a Kurdish name. But saying “Hazhaar is a Kurdish” is a rather an inaccurate expression).
On many occasion, the article “the” is used before “Baloch”, when we refer to people of Balochistan (in national adjective usage). For instance, national adjectives ending in “ch” or “sh” e.g. the Dutch, the Spanish, the Welsh (see The Oxford Library of English Usage, Chapter I, 1990. Similarly we can say “the Baloch” etc. Other parallel examples:Javier is a Spaniard. He speaks Spanish. He eats Spanish food. He is a Spanish person. (But although one may say that “He is a Spanish”, the more accurate way is to say it is “Javier is a Spaniard”, instead of “Javier is a Spanish. The same applies for Scot (native Scottish person from Scotland) etc.Please remember that there is not a universal rule about this issue. e.g. ” Shah Latif was a Sindi (Sindhi). He spoke Sindi (Sindhi) and he was from Sind (Sindh). As you see in this case the word “Sindi” is used both as the noun for naming people from Sind and the language.As for Plural version of the word “Baloch”, there is no universal accepted form. Some people use “Balochs”, other use “Baloches”. Increasing number of people use “Baloch” as both singular and plural. In my view, using “Baloch” as both singular and plural is somehow a better way to use it. A parallel in English language is the=2 0word “Dutch” (people and language of Holland). When referring to people from Holland, they are called “Dutch”, whether one or many people. I have never seen expressions such as “Dutchs” or “Dutches”. I think it looks nicer in a sentence to use “Baloch” as both singular and plural form. One can understand from the sentence, whether we talk about one person or many. It is a personal preference, but words “Balochs” or “Baloches” do not appeal to me. I rather use “Baloch” only. (Some people may write it as “Baluch”, “Balouch” etc. Again “Baluchs/Baluches” or “Balouchs/Balouches” do not sound “attractive”.Balochi: Anything related to the Baloch (people from Balochistan) can be described as Balochi. It can have genitive form or simply used as an adjective.

Languge of the Baloch is called Balochi. Not only, we the Baloch, call it “Balochi”, but every other non-Baloch person also calls it “Balochi”. At least, there is unanimous acceptance about this issue. There are still variations in spelling “Balochi” such as “Baluchi” and “Balouchi”. But it is not a big issue.
“Balochi” is mainly used as an adjective e.g. “Balochi dress”, “Balochi book”, “Balochi dance”, etc. “Baloch” cannot be used in the same context. It is, however, to be noticed when one refers directly to people, i.e. the Baloch, it is rather use “Baloch” not “Balochi” in any compound nouns. e.g.
Baloch Students’ Federation (not Balochi Students’ Federation) as it refers to Baloch people (in this case, students). Also=2 0″Baloch women” but NOT Balochi women (again Baloch refers to people, women) etc.In the meantime, there is a need for a flexible approach towards this issue, as there is no standard/universal rule especially with regards to “Baloch”, “Balochi” etc. The same applies to Balochi orthography (both in Persian/Urdu and Latin/English alphabets). At this stage, there is no excuse for exclusion of any approach, style and preferences. As for various dialects of Balochi language, there is an even greater need for flexibility. All Balochi accents should be encouraged both orally and in written forms.

Karachi: Lyari And Malir See Revival Of Interest In Baloch Culture

Several educational organisations, musical clubs and video academies have cropped up in Lyari, Malir and Golimar areas in the informal sector, which are playing a crucial role in the promotion of the Balochi language

KARACHI, March 2: Years of neglect and backwardness has created a sense of national identity among the Baloch populace of Karachi. Many of them think that it can only be maintained by preserving their culture and language.

Of late, it is witnessed that a slow cultural revolution is taking place in Lyari, Malir, Golimar and other Baloch-dominated localities as the area residents link their destiny with the revival of their culture and language.

Moreover, the Balochistan military operation has changed their psyche and they have started talking about Baloch nationalism, Balochistan and its history.

Several educational organisations, musical clubs and video academies have cropped up in Lyari, Malir and Golimar areas in the informal sector, which are playing a crucial role in the promotion of the Balochi language.

Besides, some non-governmental organisations have established several coaching centres where Balochi as well as English language classes are being conducted. In Lyari, these institutions are being run in Singoolane and Nawalane by youths, who have been striving hard for the promotion of the Balochi language.

Several women activists have been actively participating in the language classes. They regularly contact Baloch women and motivate them to learn the Balochi language.

Most textbooks in Balochi language have also been translated into English. Besides, some monthly and daily publications are also being distributed in the Baloch-dominated areas of the city. One such monthly is “Labzank”, which is being published and distributed in Lyari on a regular basis. “Tawar”, a daily published both in the Urdu and English languages, is also available in the local markets.

An activist who did not want to disclose his identity said, “We have of course lit a candle in a huge, dark ditch. I wish this candle may continue to provide light forever.

“We believe we can make a difference if we keep on working and do not get despaired. I want every Baloch to learn, read, write, listen to and speak the Balochi language worldwide. And I hope the success is in the offing.”

Most teachers in the informal educational centres are spending their time and efforts to help children in their studies and to keep them away from drugs.

According to Majeed Baloch, a private school teacher who also works for a street school “ARM” in Baghdadi area, coaching classes have become essential for children because they learn so little in the public schools where teachers seldom take classes and expect students to work on their own.

“They ask children to buy guidebooks and study their notes,” confided a volunteer, saying that how government school teachers expected the poor children or their families would manage to pay for the costly guides.

Seeing the progress made by street schools in Lyari, youths in Malir and Golimar have now taken up the task and started sponsoring street schools in their respective localities. “They really need help. I hope other social organisations will come forward and lend a helping hand,” a senior social worker observed.

Meanwhile, a social worker told Dawn that a street school in Baghdadi which was abandoned some time ago due to gang warfare would be reopened very soon. The wall of the Bombassa Street has been repainted. In the same locality, a new NGO has emerged with the support of a Balochistan-based nationalist party.